CHO-K1

CHO-K1 chinese hamster ovary

Cell Type:
Ovary Epith.
Tissue Origin:
ovarian
Species:
hamster
Research Area:
Cancer Research/Cell Biology
Gene Expression
Cell Characteristics:
Adherent

Recommended Media

Developed for low density (clonal) growth of CHO cells.

Storage = 2ºC to 8ºC

12-618 = with L-glutamine
BE02-014 = with UltraGlutamine I, without thymidine

Ham's F12 Medium is a nutrient mixture designed to cultivate a wide variety of mammalian and hybridoma cells (including low density (clonal) growth of CHO cells) when used with serum in combination with hormones and transferrin.

PC-1™ is a low-protein, serum-free medium intended for the culture of primary cells and anchorage-dependent cell lines. PC-1 is formulated in a specially modified DMEM/F12 base and contains a complete HEPES buffering system with known amounts of insulin, transferrin, fatty acids, and proprietary proteins assembled under strict quality control procedures. PC-1™ is intended for a variety of research and industrial applications and is formulated using defined components for optimal cell growth, while maintaining the lowest possible protein content.
PC-1™ does not contain L-glutamine.

PC-1™ Liquid Base Medium is to be stored at 2°C-8°C.
The Supplement should be stored at -20°C.
When these two components are combined, the resulting PC-1™ Complete Medium is stable for 45 days at 2°C-8°C.

Once thawed, the appropriate volume of one vial of PC-1™ Supplement must be combined with the companion volume of PC-1™ Liquid Base Medium. Partial reconstitution or repeated freezing and thawing of the PC-1™ Supplement is not advised.

UltraMEM Reduced Serum Medium is a chemically-defined medium designed to support growth and maintenance of several anchorage-dependent cell types under reduced serum concentrations. When supplemented with 2-4% serum, UltraMEM Medium growth performance is comparable and, in some instances, superior to that of standard media supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum.

Growth performance in UltraMEM can be further increased by addition of insulin, transferrin, selenium, and ethanolamine [ITS or ITES] to the basal medium.

Storage = 2ºC to 8ºC 

ProCHO™ Protein-free CHO Media were developed specifically to facilitate the production and downstream processing of recombinant proteins expressed in CHO cells. These protein-free formulations support high-density cultures without the need for animal derived components.
Very low levels of recombinant insulin facilitate both downstream purification and regulatory compliance.

The following media systems are available:
- ProCHO™ 4 Medium – For concurrent transition of adherent CHO cells to serum-free and suspension culture; supports faster doubling times
- ProCHO™ 5 Medium – For CHO cells already growing in suspension; supports increased protein production
- ProCHO™ AT Medium – For adherent culture of CHO cells

Storage = 2°C to 8°C

12-029Q - ProCHO™ 4 with phenol red and 0.1% Pluronic® F-68; but without L-glutamine, hypoxanthine, or thymidine.
04-919Q - ProCHO™ 4 with 0.1% Pluronic® F-68; and without phenol red, L-glutamine, hypoxanthine, or thymidine.

12-766Q - ProCHO™ 5  with 0.1% Pluronic® F-68; and without L-glutamine, phenol red, hypoxanthine, or thymidine.
BE15-766 - ProCHO™ 5 powder without phenol red

BE02-016 - ProCHO™-AT contains L-glutamine and does not contain hypoxanthine or thymidine.

PowerCHO™ Chemically Defined, Serum-free and hydrolysate-free CHO Media are non-animal origin media designed to support the growth of CHO cell lines, particularly high-density suspension cultures.

For therapeutic bioprocessing applications, these protein-free formulations also facilitate both downstream purification and regulatory compliance.

Storage = 2°C to 8°C

12-770Q - PowerCHO™-1 (with HEPES and Pluronic® F-68, without phenol red, hypoxanthine, thymidine, or L-glutamine)
12-771Q - PowerCHO™-2 (with HEPES and Pluronic® F-68, without phenol red, hypoxanthine, thymidine, or L-glutamine)
BE15-771N - PowerCHO™-2 powder (with HEPES and Pluronic® F-68, without phenol red, hypoxanthine, thymidine, or L-glutamine)
12-772Q - PowerCHO™-3 (with HEPES and Pluronic® F-68, without phenol red, hypoxanthine, thymidine, or L-glutamine)

BE12-776Q - PowerCHO™-GS (with HEPES and Pluronic® F-68, without insulin, phenol red or L-glutamine)
PowerCHO™ -GS is designed for use with Lonza's Proprietary GS Gene Expression System™.

12-929Q - PowerCHO™ - Advance

ProFreeze™-CDM, NAO, Chemically Defined Freeze Medium (2X) is universally suitable for cryopreserving many cell types in the absence of fetal bovine serum (FBS), which is particularly advantageous for freezing of cells cultured in a serum-free and animal component-free environment.
This protein-free freezing medium contains no animal derived components, insulin, or hydrolysate, and maintains high cell viability upon recovery from frozen storage.

ProFreeze™ Medium requires the addition of 15% reagent or spectrophotometric grade dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) at time of use.

Storage = 2°C to 8°C

HL-1™ is a Serum-free culture medium containing less than 30 µg protein per ml. Components of HL-1 include known amounts of insulin, a variety of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids and proprietary stabilizing bovine proteins. It contains no bovine serum albumin and does not contain L-glutamine.
HL-1™ will support the serum-free growth of various hybridomas and certain other differentiated cells of lymphoid origin. 

Storage = 2°C to 8°C

Transfection Information

Lonza Optimized Protocol
Optimization Guideline
Filter:
The table below shows data for the cell type and Nucleofector™ Platform selected. Those data are either based on Lonza Optimized Protocols or on results shared from customers who performed an optimization based on our guidelines. In case no data are shown for the selected Nucleofector™ Platform, please take a look at our optimization strategy to get further guidance on how to easily determine optimal Nucleofection conditions yourself.
Protocol Kit Program Cells Efficiency Viable Cells Substrate Format Platform
T

U-023

1e6 84% ±4 96% ±1 Plasmid (general) 2 µg 100 µl I/II/2b
T U-023 1e6 94% ±2 87% Plasmid (general) 2 µg 100 µl I/II/2b
SF

DT-133

2e5 80-84% 68-74% Plasmid (general) 0.2 µg 20 µl 4D X-Unit
SF

DT-133

1e6 71-79% 62-72% Plasmid (general) 1 µg 100 µl 4D X-Unit
T

U-027

1e6 84% ±2 53% ±14 Plasmid (general) 5 µg 100 µl I/II/2b
SF 96-DT-133 2e5 86% ±6 97% ±1 Plasmid (general) 0.4 µg 20 µl Shuttle

Citations (14)

Categories:
Transfection, Cell Lines and Primary Cancer Cells 
Authors:
Lang S1, Drewello D1, Wichter J2, Nommay A1, Wilms B1, Knopf HP1, Jostock T3. 
In:
Biotechnol Bioeng (2016) 113: 11 
Categories:
Live Cell Imaging 
Authors:
Brunetti J, Depau L, Falciani C, Gentile M, Mandarini E, Riolo G, Lupetti P, Pini A, Bracci L 
In:
Scientific Reports (2016) 6: 27174 
Categories:
Transfection 
Authors:
Kah Fai Chan, Wahyu Shahreel, Corrine Wan, Gavin Teo, Noor Hayati, Shi Jie Tay, Wen Han Tong, Yuansheng Yang, Pauline M. Rudd, Peiqing Zhang, Zhiwei Song 
In:
Biotechnology Journal (2015) -: - 
Categories:
Classical Media and Reagents, Serum-free and Speciality Media, Transfection 
Authors:
Maria Cherian R1, Gaunitz S, Nilsson A, Liu J, Karlsson NG, Holgersson J. 
In:
Glycobiology (2014) 24 (1): 26-38 
Categories:
Classical Media and Reagents, Serum-free and Speciality Media, Transfection 
Authors:
Ilyushin DG1, Smirnov IV, Belogurov AA Jr, Dyachenko IA, Zharmukhamedova TIu, Novozhilova TI, Bychikhin EA, Serebryakova MV, Kharybin ON, Murashev AN, Anikienko KA, Nikolaev EN, Ponomarenko NA, Genkin DD, Blackburn GM, Masson P, Gabibov AG 
In:
Proc Natl Acad Sci USA (2013) 110(4): 1243–1248 
Categories:
Transfection 
Authors:
Brown JM, Chung S, Das A, Shelness G, Rudel LL, Yu L 
In:
J Lipid Res (2007) 48(10): 2295-305 
Categories:
Transfection 
Authors:
Haschemi A, Wagner O, Marculescu R, Wegiel B, Robson SC, Gagliani N, Gallo D, Chen JF, Bach FH, Otterbein LE 
In:
J Immunol (2007) 178(9): 5921-9 
Categories:
Transfection 
Authors:
Nissom PM, Lo SL, Lo JC, Ong PF, Lim JW, Ou K, Liang RC, Seow TK, Chung MC 
In:
FEBS Lett (2006) 580(9): 2216-26 
Categories:
Transfection 
Authors:
Thompson J and Begenisich T 
In:
J Gen Physiol (2006) 127(2): 159-169 
Categories:
Transfection 
Authors:
Rosenblum MD, Woodliff JE, Madsen NA, McOlash LJ, Keller MR and Truitt RL 
In:
J Invest Dermatol (2005) 125(6): 1130-1138 
Categories:
Transfection 
Authors:
Gresch O, Engel FB, Nesic D, Tran TT, England HM, Hickman ES, Korner I, Gan L, Chen S, Castro-Obregon S, Hammermann R, Wolf J, Muller-Hartmann H, Nix M, Siebenkotten G, Kraus G and Lun K 
In:
Methods (2004) 33(2): 151-163 
Categories:
Transfection 
Authors:
Zhang J, Dudley-Rucker N, Crowley JR, Lopez-Perez E, Issandou M, Schaffer JE and Ory DS 
In:
J Lipid Res (2004) 45(2): 223-231 
Categories:
Transfection 
Authors:
Bartholome B, Spies CM, Gaber T, Schuchmann S, Berki T, Kunkel D, Bienert M, Radbruch A, Burmester G-R, Lauster R, Scheffold A and Buttgereit F 
In:
FASEB J (2004) 18(1): 70-80 
Categories:
Live Cell Imaging, Laboratory Instrumentation  
Authors:
Brunetti J1, Depau L1, Falciani C2, Gentile M3, Mandarini E1, Riolo G1, Lupetti P3, Pini A1,2, Bracci L1,2 
In:
Scientific Reports () 6: 27174 
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