Tau-dependent microtubule disassembly initiated by prefibrillar -amyloid

Authors:
King ME, Kan HM, Baas PW, Erisir A, Glabe CG, Bloom GS
In:
Source: J Cell Biol
Publication Date: (2006)
Issue: 175(4): 541-6
Research Area:
Neurobiology
Cells used in publication:
Neuron, hippo/cortical, rat
Species: rat
Tissue Origin: brain
CV1
Species: monkey
Tissue Origin: kidney
Neuron, mesencephalic, rat
Species: rat
Tissue Origin: brain
Neuron, hippocampal, rat
Species: rat
Tissue Origin: brain
Platform:
Nucleofectorâ„¢ I/II/2b
Abstract
Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is defined histopathologically by extracellular beta-amyloid (Abeta) fibrils plus intraneuronal tau filaments. Studies of transgenic mice and cultured cells indicate that AD is caused by a pathological cascade in which Abeta lies upstream of tau, but the steps that connect Abeta to tau have remained undefined. We demonstrate that tau confers acute hypersensitivity of microtubules to prefibrillar, extracellular Abeta in nonneuronal cells that express transfected tau and in cultured neurons that express endogenous tau. Prefibrillar Abeta42 was active at submicromolar concentrations, several-fold below those required for equivalent effects of prefibrillar Abeta40, and microtubules were insensitive to fibrillar Abeta. The active region of tau was localized to an N-terminal domain that does not bind microtubules and is not part of the region of tau that assembles into filaments. These results suggest that a seminal cell biological event in AD pathogenesis is acute, tau-dependent loss of microtubule integrity caused by exposure of neurons to readily diffusible Abeta.