Endophilin I expression is increased in the brains of Alzheimer's disease patients

Authors:
Ren Y, Xu HW, Davey F, Taylor M, Aiton J, Coote P, Fang F, Yao J, Chen JX, Yan SD, Gunn-Moore FJ
In:
Source: J Biol Chem
Publication Date: (2008)
Issue: 283(9): 5685-91
Research Area:
Neurobiology
Cells used in publication:
Neuron, cortical, mouse
Species: mouse
Tissue Origin: brain
Platform:
Nucleofectorâ„¢ I/II/2b
Abstract
Alzheimer's patients have increased levels of both the 42 beta amyloid-beta-peptide (Abeta) and Amyloid Binding Alcohol Dehydrogenase (ABAD) which is an intracellular binding site for Abeta. The over-expression of Abeta and ABAD in transgenic mice has shown that the binding of Abeta to ABAD results in amplified neuronal stress and impairment of learning and memory. From a proteomic analysis of the brains from these animals we have identified for the first time that the protein endophilin I increases in Alzheimer's diseased brain. The increase in endophilin I levels in neurons is linked to an increase in the activation of the stress kinase c-Jun N-terminal kinase with the subsequent death of the neurons. We also demonstrate in living animals that the expression level of endophilin I is an indicator for the interaction of ABAD and Abeta as its expression levels return to normal if this interaction is perturbed. Therefore this identifies endophilin I as a new indicator of the progression of Alzheimer's disease.